Types of Therapeutic Diets

Medical nutrition therapy

Types of Therapeutic Diets

Common therapeutic diets include:

Additional feedings

– In addition to meal, extra nutrition may be ordered as:

  • Supplements – usually ordered as liquid nutritional shakes once, twice or three times per day; given either with meals or between meals
  • Nourishments – ordered as a snack food or beverage items to be given between meals mid-morning and/or mid-afternoon
  • HS snack – ordered as a snack food or beverage items to be given at the hour of sleep

Supplement

dietary supplement is a product intended for ingestion that contains a “dietary ingredient” intended to add further nutritional value to (supplement) the diet. A “dietary ingredient” may be one, or any combination, of the following substances:

(a vitamin ,a mineral , an herb or other botanical , an amino acid)

  • a dietary substance for use by people to supplement the diet by increasing the total dietary intake

Dietary supplements may be found in many forms such as tablets, capsules, softgels, gelcaps, liquids, or powders. Some dietary supplements can help ensure that you get an adequate dietary intake of essential nutrients; others may help you reduce your risk of disease

What is a dietary supplement?

A dietary supplement is a vitamin, mineral that you take to improve your health or wellness. These supplements are generally not intended to cure or treat diseases or medical conditions, unless they have been approved for a health claim by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA).

If you don’t eat a variety of healthy foods, such as fruits, vegetables, lean meats and fish, you may not be getting all the micronutrients your body needs. A multivitamin or supplement may be able to help. Other people who may benefit from taking a multivitamin or supplement include:

  • Vegetarians who do not eat any animal products (vegans)
  • Women who are pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • Women who are breastfeeding
  • Women who experience heavy menstrual periods
  • Women who have gone through menopause
  • People who have had gastric bypass surgery for weight loss
  • People who have a medical condition that affects the way the body digests food, such as gastrointestinal disease, lactose intolerance, or food allergies
  • People who have diseases of the stomach, liver, pancreas, or gall bladder

HS snack

HS in this context stands for “hour before sleep” or bedtime snack.
It can encompass what ever you want for a snack or what ever you are allowed if you have health issues.
For a diabetic, it would be a protein and a complex carb.
A very popular diabetic HS snack is skim milk and graham crackers or a half a turkey sandwich on whole wheat bread.

It is a snack that is generally given to diabetics after dinner (around 8 pm in the hospital I work in) to ensure they are getting the carbs they need in a day and at regularly spaced intervals. It should contain 1 carb exchange (or two, depending on the person and how many carbs they need in a day, but it is usually just 1). So a fruit (apple, banana, canned fruit cup), half a sandwhich (because each piece of bread is a carb, so only 1 piece should be used – meat is carb free), crackers, a juice, etc. Anything that would equal 1 carb exchange (or 15 carbohydrates…you can find the # of carbohydrates per serving on the package). Hope that helps you!!

– blood sugar levels,. Blood sugar levels at bedtime are particularly important to look at. A study in the Journal of Diabetes Care recommends having a snack if your blood sugar is less than 126 mg/dl, but to avoid snacking if your blood sugar is higher than 180 mg/dl.

Why is Snacking Important for People with Diabetes?

what’s called nocturnal hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) while they sleep.

If your blood sugar at bedtime is low – i.e., less than 126 mg/dl ? then a snack can help to prevent this nighttime dip. But be wise about your snack selection: this isn’t a green light to eat just anything. It’s important to choose a snack that is low in calories, as well as a healthy source of carbohydrate and protein.

Best Bedtime Snacks

A general rule of thumb is 15-30 grams of carbs and about an ounce (7 grams) of protein for a bedtime snack. For example, a glass of skim milk and 3 graham crackers will provide approximately 30 grams of carbs, 8 grams of protein and 170 calories. Remember, the purpose of snacking at bedtime is to prevent you from experiencing the side effects of hypoglycemia while you sleep

Nourishments

in this context stands for “hour before sleep” or bedtime snack

to ensure they are getting the carbs they need in a day and at regularly spaced intervals.It should contain 1 carb exchange (or two, depending on the person and how many carbs they need in a day, but it is usually just 1)

it is allowed if you have health issues.

such:

diabetic )it would be a protein and a complex carb

Why is Snacking Important for People with Diabetes?

what’s called nocturnal hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) while they sleep

recommends having a snack if your blood sugar is less than 126 mg/dl

HS snack is

skim milk

graham crackers

a half sandwich on whole wheat bread

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. Indications:  The patient must meet one or more of the following criteria to qualify for nourishments or supplements, except in special situations that must be approved by the institution Chief Medical Executive (CME) or Supervising Dentist.

  1. Pregnancy and lactation
  2. Patients with juvenile onset type one diabetes mellitus or brittle diabetes.
  3. Patients with impaired mastication and/or dysphagia, including that caused by:

1) Dental or oropharyngeal conditions

2) Cerebrovascular or other significant neurological condition

3) Obstructed or esophageal dysfunction

  1. Moderate to severe protein/calorie malnutrition due to metabolic deficiency or metabolic response to injury/illness evidenced by:

1) Significant weight loss of ten (10) percent or more over the prior six (6) months

2) Serum albumin less than 2.5 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)  3) BMI less than 18

  1. Decompensated end stage liver disease with 1) Ascites requiring paracentesis or 2) Encephalopathy requiring hospitalization.

Patients with disorders or conditions impeding mastication or causing dysphagia may be housed in a licensed bed or OHU or they may be candidates to receive nourishments or supplements in the outpatient setting at the discretion of the CME or Supervising Dentist.

 

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